Archive for the ‘Uncategorized’ Category

Tel T461 3D Games and Interactive Graphics

(using Unity)

MW – 3:15 — 5:15

 

Thinking about a career in the game industry?  …educational software? …interactive graphics?  …immersive media?  Would you like to see your work deployed as standalone Mac or PC software, on the web, or on the iPhone or Android devises?

 

Unity is one of the most powerful game engines available anywhere.  Using it you can construct immersive 3D worlds like a deserted island complete with trees and grass and abandoned buildings or a lost planet in deep space or the surface of a billiard table on which the balls repel each other.  Once you’ve built your world, you can populate it with 3D graphics you make in Maya or Cinema 4D, or find on the web.  And, having built your world and filled it with objects, you can use scripts to create the rules that guide players through it.

 

The first half of class will be used to construct a simple first person adventure game called “Survival Island.”  It introduces a broad set of fundamental skills and techniques on which you can base your own work.  The second half of class is largely devoted to constructing individual projects.  Although programming experience or a background in graphics can help you build better games, all required code and techniques will be demonstrated in class.

 

We will be using the educational version of Unity Pro, but a complete and powerful “standard” edition is available free, so you can continue using the tool long after the class has ended.

 

Prerequisites: TEL-T 361 with a grade of C- or higher, or consent of instructor.  It is not necessary to write a proposal to get into this class (such a requirement was listed in the original course description).

 

Contact me for permission to take the class.

 

Curious about Unity?  See: http://unity3d.com

 

Michael Chabin

Summer 2013 T283

Posted: April 3, 2013 by IUsec in Uncategorized

Mon, Tue, Wed, Thu & Fri

3:00 – 5:10 pm

Jun 3 – Jun 28, 2013

Course Description

Intro to Interactive Media Design is a practical, introductory

course to the world of interactive and digital media design.

The focus will be on creating interactive experiences that

are both functional and engaging. This will be approached

from various points-of-view, including design, usability,

technique, and entertainment. We will discuss not only the

specifics of how to make something work, but strategies

concerning how to make it work well, while making it fun and

easy to understand for your audience.

This is a class for beginners and assumes no previous experience

or expertise. Students with some background in

digital design are encouraged to enroll, as many projects are

flexible. Advanced students are encouraged to explore tools

and techniques that may be beyond the scope of the course

but are right for them.

 

Course Objectives

Introduce students to concepts of communication

through digital multimedia.

Explore the basics of HTML 5, Cascading Style Sheets

(CSS 3), JavaScript, digital imaging, web-based typography,

digital audio, and Flash animation.

Analyze and test the usability of digital media.

Provide a forum for discussion where students can learn

from each other through critique.

Instructor

Norbert Herber (nherber@indiana.edu)

http://www.indiana.edu/~audioweb/T284

Study with Susan Kelly in London this spring.
Application Deadline is 4 February.

May 2013 – London, England
T452 Script to Screen
London Dates
• Dates: May 8 to May 29, 2013
Program Organization
• This is an IU-Administered Program
• Summer Program
• Classes are conducted at the IES Center in Bloomsbury District near the British Museum
• Course is based at the Institute for the International Education of Students (IES)
• Class is taught by IU Department of Telecommunications faculty member Susan Kelly
• 15-20 IU students
Academic Program
• Script to Screen: Story Development for Film and Television in Great Britain
• 3 IUB credit hours in TEL-T 452
• Learn story structure, character development, script formatting and the role of culturally sensitive stories in the unique film and television production model of the UK. Read scripts, develop and pitch your own stories, talk to industry professionals, and visit locations and studios where your favorite films have been made.
• Daily lectures, screenings, and story development workshops.
• Field trips to film locations in historical locations include Bath, Oxford, Greenwich, Warner Bro. Studies and Pinewood Studios.
• Day long excursions to see the locations for the film series Harry Potter, James Bond, and Sherlock Holmes, as well as The King’s Speech and Pride and Prejudice. We will also visit the locations for the BBC television series Sherlock and Downton Abbey.
• Weekend trip to France to visit the Normandy Beaches and the WWII American Memorial Cemetery overlooking Omaha Beach and the English Channel.
The available coursework is particularly suited for, but not necessarily limited to, the following academic interests: Comparative Literature, Communications, English, History, Journalism, Telecommunications, and Theater, Drama, Performing Arts, and Dance.
Additional Information
• IES-London Web page
• IU Getting Started Handbook
Housing Information
• Shared rooms in student residence hall in central London
Program Eligibility
• are a degree candidate at any Indiana University campus who is making normal academic progress,
• are in at least your fourth full-time semester of college, and
• have an overall cumulative GPA of approximately 3.0.
• Preference will be given to those who have taken a 100 or 200 level writing, script analysis, directing, or production class such as ENG-W 131, TEL-T 206, TEL-T 283, C-190 or THTR-T 101.
Complete eligibility criteria and selection criteria are outlined within the Academic Policies and Procedures of the Office of Overseas Study. Selection based on maturity, seriousness of purpose, and match between program and applicant’s academic needs. Students on disciplinary probation during program period are not eligible.

TEL-T 344 PROGRAMMING STRATEGIES
Professor Michael McGregor
Days & Times: TuTh 4:00PM – 6:45PM
Meeting Dates: 03/04/2013 – 05/03/2013 (Second Eight-Weeks)
Room: Willkie C (WI) C11

Bulletin Description:
Broadcast, cable, and satellite program evaluation, selection, and scheduling. Decision-making strategies in commercial television and radio at the network and local levels, commercial cable networks and systems, noncommercial outlets, and program syndication.

Class Notes
T 344 : P – TEL-T 207 with a grade of C- or higher, or consent of instructor
Above class meets second eight weeks only

English-Language Summer Program in BerlinJune 17 – July 13, 2013
COURSE: “Sites of Memory”

Do you want to earn 3 credits by doing an amazing independent study?
 
Do you like editing and putting together documentaries?
 
If the answer is YES, you should definitely check out this opportunity!
 
My name is Fabio Monticone and I am a graduate student of the Dept. of Telecommunications. I am looking for an editor to assist with the editing and development of a documentary about an Italian baseball team.
 
You must have experience with Final Cut Pro and preferably some Audio Production background as well.
 
While earning 3 credits you will learn how to deliver a professional edit under tight deadlines while working directly with me, the producer/director, until the final product is delivered in early April.
 
This is a great opportunity to earn credits while developing your editing skills while gaining relevant experience in the field.

Contact

fmontico@indiana.edu

Dates

  • Tentative Dates: May 7 to May 31, 2013

Program Organization

  • This is an IU-Administered Program
  • Summer Program
  • Classes are conducted at the IES Center in Bloomsbury District near the British Museum
  • Course is based at the Institute for the International Education of Students (IES)
  • Class is taught by IU Department of Telecommunications faculty member Susan Kelly
  • 15-20 IU students

Academic Program

  • Script to Screen: Scriptwriting for Film and Television in Great Britain
  • 3 IUB credit hours in TEL-T 452
  • Learn story structure, character development, script formatting and the role of culturally sensitive stories in the unique film and television production model of the UK. Read scripts, develop and pitch your own stories, talk to industry professionals, and visit locations and studios where your favorite films have been made.
  • Daily lectures, screenings, and story development workshops.
  • Field trips to film locations in historical locations include Bath, Oxford, Greenwich, Warner Bro. Studies and Pinewood Studios.
  • Day long excursions to see the locations for the film series Harry Potter, James Bond, and Sherlock Holmes, as well as The King’s Speech and Pride and Prejudice. We will also visit the locations for the BBC television series Sherlock and Downton Abbey.
  • Weekend trip to France to visit the Normandy Beaches and the WWII American Memorial Cemetery overlooking Omaha Beach and the English Channel. 

The available coursework is particularly suited for, but not necessarily limited to, the following academic interests: Comparative Literature, Communications, English, History, Journalism, Telecommunications, and Theater, Drama, Performing Arts, and Dance.

Additional Information

Housing Information

Program Eligibility

  • are a degree candidate at any Indiana University campus who is making normal academic progress,
  • are in at least your fourth full-time semester of college, and
  • have an overall cumulative GPA of approximately 3.0.
  • Preference will be given to those who have taken a 100 or 200 level writing, script analysis, directing, or production class such as ENG-W 131, TEL-T 206, TEL-T 283, C-190 or THTR-T 101.

Complete eligibility criteria and selection criteria are outlined within the Academic Policies and Procedures of the Office of Overseas Study. Selection based on maturity, seriousness of purpose, and match between program and applicant’s academic needs. Students on disciplinary probation during program period are not eligible.

A Chance to Explore

Optometric Topics and Learn a Marketable Skill!

 

The IU School of Optometry Optician/Technician Program offers a two-semester certificate and a two-year Associate of Science degree.  Any student may sample optometry-related topics by taking one or more of our courses.  A popular course for spring semester is TOPT-V 153 Ophthalmic Dispensing (3 credits).  No authorization is necessary and there are no prerequisites.  It is a very interesting class, a great way to learn a marketable skill in the optical field and often leads to job opportunities!

 

Brief Course Description:

Students in this course will learn a practical skill in an area applicable to both optometry and opticianry.  Students enjoy “hands-on” instruction involving a variety of different activities with optical lenses and frames.  No previous experience is necessary and no prerequisites are required.

 

TOPT-V 153 Ophthalmic Dispensing* (3 cr.) (Offered spring only)

Schedule for spring 2013

Lecture #20096                       3-3:50 pm M W, room OPT 111

Discussion #20097                  4-4:50 pm M, room OPT 111

Lab Section #20098                 1:30-3:20 pm T R, room OPT 113  

or

Lab Section #23946                 3:30-5:20 pm TR, room OPT 113

*Note: If taking this as an elective, this course may or may not count toward your specific degree requirements.  Check with your school advisor for verification.

 

For more information about this course, the certificate or AS degree:

Contact Sandi Pickel at 812-855-3997 email: pickels@indiana.edu

www.opt.indiana.edu/StuAdmin/OptTechProgram.aspx

Applications for Spring 2013 400-level advanced production applications are now on-line.

Students can apply at: http://www.indiana.edu/~telecom/undergraduate/production.shtml

The deadline for applying is 12 noon, Wednesday, October 17th.

POLISH FILM

SLAV-P366

F2012: 2nd 8 weeks

MW 4-6 pm; mandatory film screenings: MW 6-8 pm carries CASE A&H, CASE GCC

Instructor: Prof. Justyna Beinek

 

Kieslowski, Polanski, Wajda, Holland – these Polish directors have achieved worldwide acclaim through their original ways of seeing the world through the camera lens.  But there is much more to explore in post-war Polish cinema.  Films of the “Polish School” often represented the experience of World War II and Stalinism; the “cinema of moral unrest” focused on moral choices of an individual; and many superb comedies were created as a response to the absurdity of everyday life under communism.  After the fall of communism in 1989, Polish cinema turned toward new topics (homelessness, child abuse, drug culture) and genres/styles (pop culture action flicks, gangster movies).  Once dominated by a handful of established directors, Polish cinema today dazzles with many talented filmmakers such as Kolski, Szumowska, Kedzierzawska, Trzaskalski, Glinski, Jakimowski, Fabicki, Palkowski, Joanna Kos-Krauze, Krzysztof Krauze, Dumala, and Baginski.

 

 

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Seats still available for Rock Against the State (SLAV-S149)!

 

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SLAV-S149

Rock Against the State:

    The Czechoslovak and American Countercultures of the 1960s and 1970s

F2012: 2nd 8 weeks: MW 4-6:30 pm

CASE A&H, CASE GCC

Instructor: Dr. Craig Cravens, Dept. of Slavic Languages & Literatures

“It wasn’t all those atomic weapons, and facing them down, and all that big bullshit.  What finally crumbled the wall was the f*ckin’ music, man.  You cannot stop it.  It is the most subversive thing … You can build a wall to stop people, but eventually the music—it’ll get across that wall.

—Keith Richards of the Rolling Stones

“Did you know that I am president because of you?”

—Czechoslovak President Václav Havel to an astonished Lou Reed

Description

In 1968, protest movements broke out all over the world—in the United States, France, Mexico, and Czechoslovakia.  This course is an interdisciplinary investigation of the cultural and political phenomenon of dissent in two extremely different cultures—the capitalist United States and communist East-Central Europe, primarily Czechoslovakia.  In the United States people rebelled against capitalism, in Czechoslovakia against communism.  What was common between these respective rebellions was a distaste for authoritarianism in any form.  The rebels in both countries rejected institutions, political parties, and political leaders.

Using sources ranging from political essays to novels, music, film, and drama, students will explore the development of the ideas and ideals of the oppositional movements of these two cultures.

The course presupposes no background and will provide whatever framework is necessary to deal with the major issues being considered.