FINA-A 226 and FINA-A 421 information

Posted: November 17, 2011 by IUsec in Uncategorized

Spring 2012

FINA-A 226 class # 29566

Tuesdays and Thursdays  9:30 – 10:45 a.m.

Fine Arts 010

CASE A&H, CASE GCC distribution

Medieval Art and Architecture

Instructor:  Sarah Bassett

 

This course offers a survey of the art and architecture of the Middle Ages in the Mediterranean world and Western Europe from the 4th through the 15th centuries.  Students will be introduced to the major chronological periods of medieval art, and with them such characteristically medieval monuments as the early Christian basilica and the Gothic cathedral, Byzantine mosaics and Romanesque sculptured portals, illuminated manuscripts and reliquaries. These works of art and architecture will form the armature on which to build a basic understanding of medieval modes of representation and the cultural contexts in which they flourished. The aims of this course are: 1) to provide an overview of the major trends in Medieval art and architecture and the contexts in which they flourished; 2) to develop active listening and note-taking skills; 3) to develop skills of description and analysis with respect to works of art and the written texts associated with them; and 4) to introduce students the principle of intellectual transference, the process through which skills and understanding brought to bear on one subject may be applied to another. To these ends there will be emphasis not only on looking at works of art and architecture, but also on reading and writing.

 

 

 

Spring 2012

FINA-A 421 class # 29975 Undergraduate students only

Carries CASE S&H

FINA-A 421 class # 29974 Graduate students only

Tuesdays and Thursdays  2:30 – 4:00 p.m.

Fine Arts 010

Early Christian Art

Instructor: Sarah Bassett

 

 

In A.D. 313 the emperors Constantine and Licinius met at Milan where they agreed to recognize the legal personality of the Christian churches that had been operating within the confines of the Roman Empire since the first century, and to tolerate all religions equally. This policy together with the conversion of Constantine to Christianity marked the moment at which Christianity, a hitherto undistinguished minority religion, joined forces with the powerful engine of the Roman state. This was a union that eventually transformed the nature of both entities.  This course explores the dialogue between Roman and Christian culture that took place from the fourth through the seventh centuries as manifest in the visual traditions of painting, sculpture, and architecture. Its aim is four-fold: 1) to provide an overview of the art and architecture of one of the key periods of late antique and early medieval history, 2) to teach students how to read and understand complex written materials both modern and historic, 3) to introduce students to the principle of intellectual transference, the process through which skills and understanding brought to bear on one subject may be applied to another, and 4) to hone research skills and methods. To these ends the emphasis will be not only on looking at works of art and architecture, but also on reading and writing about them. 

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